Nizwa / Jabal Shams Tour

Jabal Shams Nizwa

Information

The Nizwa Fort is  the biggest castle in Nizwa, Oman. It was built in the 1650s by the second Ya’rubi Imam; Imam Sultan Bin Saif Al Ya'rubi,  although its underlying structure goes back to the 12th Century.  It is Oman's most visited national monument. The fort was the administrative seat of authority for the presiding Imams and Walis in times of peace and conflict.

The main bulk of the fort took about 12 years to complete  and was built above an underground stream. The fort is a powerful reminder of the town's significance through turbulent periods in Oman's long history. It was a formidable stronghold against raiding forces that desired Nizwa's abundant natural wealth and its strategic location at the crossroads of vital routes.

The fort's design reflects the Omani architectural ingenuity in the Ya’rubi era that witnessed considerable advancement in military fortifications and the introduction of mortar-based warfare. The main part of the fort is its enormous drum-like tower that rises 30 meters above the ground and has a diameter of 36 meters.

The strong foundations of the fort go 30 meters into the ground, and a portion of the tower is filled with rocks, dirt and rubble. The doors are inches deep and the walls are rounded and robust, designed to withstand fierce barrages of mortar fire. There are 24 openings all around the top of the tower for mortar fire.

Two cannons guard the entrance to the fort which opens into a maze of rooms, high-ceilinged halls, doorways, terraces, narrow staircases and corridors. Four cannons remain on the tower's top, down from a total of 24, which once served as the fort’s main firepower. They provided complete 360-degree coverage of the countryside around making it virtually impossible for a surprise attack on the fort without provoking a reply from the cannons.  One of them has the name of Imam Sultan bin Saif engraved on it.

Jebel Shams is the highest peak of the Jebel Al Akdhar mountain range, soaring 3,000 meters above sea level. Spectacular scenery, ancient rock carvings and remote villages – this is the ‘Grand Canyon’ of Oman. There will be time to experience some of the breath-taking scenery before continuing to the beautiful old village of Misfah. The village of Misfah is perched on the side of a mountain where narrow ancient stone pathways lead you into the valley below. You will explore this ancient labyrinth before your return trip to Muscat.

Things to do

Cultural Tour, Buy Silver, Visit Forts, Hiking

Itinerary

Drive through the Hajar Mountains to the town ship of Nizwa, the ancient capital of Oman. At Nizwa you will visit Nizwa Fort and the Traditional Souq. From here you will travel through the deep Wadi of Ghul and arrive at Jebel Shams, ‘Mountain of the Sun’ the undisputed lord of the mountains.

Cost includes:

  • 4x4 with English Speaking guide
  • Lunch, softdrinks and water on the board

Terms and Conditions Apply
Rate is based on 1 Car / Minimum 4 person basis

Cost in Omani Rials for groups of 1 to 4 people

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140 per pax80 per pax60 per pax45 per pax

117 USD
Book Now for 4 people minimum
45 OMR
Book Now for 4 people minimum

Ibri Tour

Ibri

Information

Though fairly remote, Ibri is the largest town in the Al Dhahirah region of Oman. The village has experienced rapid growth in recent times due to its proximity to Oman's limited oil fields and being the first real town after the border crossing at Al Ain (UAE) / Buraimi (Oman).

Further growth may be in store as there are plans to construct a road from Ibri into Saudi Arabia. It would still be quite a haul as Ibri rests on the cusp of the Empty Quarter, just beyond the Hajar mountains of Oman.

The village is known for its goat hair rugs (identified by black and red stripes) as well as traditional dancing, though the latter is waning. Facilities and attractions are both limited in this way station to Oman, but it is the home of a decent souk, a camel racetrack and the Al Sulaif ruins. Ibri is a rather remote village in Oman and offers few attractions, though we were charmed by Al Sulaif. This substantial walled village lies just south of town and stepping into its crumbling ruins is like stepping back into time. Although abandoned fairly recently (circa 1985), Al Sulaif strikes one as truly ancient with its seemingly endless examples of adobe brick structures. You will find a souk, a mosque and countless households and archways within its walls ringed by impressive watch towers.

Things to do

Cultural Tour, Visit Forts

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